The last decade has seen major changes and advances in the tech sector, many of them revolving around the Internet. Google, Facebook, Twitter and the iPad are just a few things that have profoundly changed how people interact online, making the Internet a more sociable and accessible medium.

But what comes next? There are several startups out there that will likely change the way you interact with the web. We’ve compiled five of them we think you might want to keep an eye on.

1. Branch

Once hailed for its ability to inspire open discussion and exchange of thought, commenting on the Internet has devolved to an often rude, hateful shouting match where civility is a thing of the past. In response to this, Popular Science recently announced they would be closing the comments sections of their articles. Branch hopes to change this by making the discussion more equal and by limiting participation. A person can post a link to something of interest and then invite, through email or social media, the individuals they would like to join the discussion. Anyone can observe the discussion, but only those invited can participate.

2. Tiny

Kevin Rose, founder of Digg, has announced his latest venture: Tiny. Tiny’s goal is to add ambiance to the blogging experience by using your computer’s webcam to let readers see the environment you’re writing in, to help the readers “get a glimpse at the author’s world.”

3. Twine

Twine is a successful KickStarter project aimed at helping you connect your life to the Internet. Want to be notified via Twitter, email or text that a particular task is done? Use Twine. A small 2.5” square box with temperature, moisture and vibration sensors, Twine can easily be attached to just about anything. Using the natural language rules, you can then customize the criteria for which you will be notified. For example, you could put a sensor in the basement and set a rule that stipulates: “WHEN moisture sensor gets wet THEN tweet ‘The basement is flooding!’”

4. Ghost

Ghost is designed to take the headache out of blogging and make it fun again. Using the easy-to-learn Markdown and offering live previews, Ghost is open source and focuses on publishing.

5. Futureful

Futureful is designed to help you mine social media to access unique and informative content. The software holds the promise of getting better the more you use it and helping you never see the same thing twice. Not a search engine or a newsreader, Futureful offers a new way to access information.

Do you know of any other startups you think are going to revolutionize the way we engage with the Internet?

Find Ryann on Google+