Percentage of each State’s Population with Access to Broadband Internet

The term “broadband internet” is used frequently in discussions about Internet access, but what does “broadband internet” actually mean? According to the FCC, to be called broadband internet download speeds must be 25 Mbps or higher. With this clear delineation, the question then becomes, “Who has access to broadband internet in the United States?” We compiled a ranked list of the states, and their respective broadband coverage. We also took a look at the largest metros across the USA, and ranked them based on broadband coverage.

Broadband Coverage by State

For this particular comparison, we took a look at which states had access to internet download speeds greater than or equal to 25 Mbps. Coverage percentage is based on population covered, not geographic coverage.   As you can see, the North East has a pretty dominant hold on broadband coverage, with Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, and Delaware all falling in the top 10 most covered states. The West and Midwest follow closely behind, with Washington, Utah, Nevada, California, and Oregon all falling in the top 15 covered states. 1. Rhode Island – 99.7% 2. New Jersey – 98.8% 3. Connecticut – 98.8% 4. District of Columbia – 98.3% 5. New York – 98% 6. Hawaii – 97% 7. Massachusetts – 97% 8. Washington – 96.8% 9. Utah – 96.2% 10. Delaware – 96% 11. Illinois – 95.3% 12. Nevada – 95.2% 13. Oregon – 94.3% 14. California – 94.3% 15. Florida – 94.2% 16. Maryland – 93.8% 17. Pennsylvania – 91.5% 18. North Carolina – 91.2% 19. Minnesota – 91% 20. Michigan – 89.2% 21. North Dakota – 88.9% 22. Arizona – 88.2% 23. Ohio – 88% 24. Georgia – 87.4% 25. Indiana – 86.9% 26. Wisconsin – 86.7% 27. Maine – 86.5% 28. South Dakota – 86.4% 29. New Hampshire – 86.2% 30. Tennessee – 85% 31. South Carolina – 84.9% 32. Virginia – 84.4% 33. Colorado – 83.2% 34. Iowa – 82.7% 35. Kansas – 81.7% 36. Idaho – 81.3% 37. Missouri – 79.8% 38. Nebraska – 79.3% 39. Louisiana – 78.9% 40. Alabama – 76.6% 41. New Mexico – 75% 42. Wyoming – 73.6% 43. Mississippi – 69.3% 44. Oklahoma – 67.8% 45. West Virginia – 67.5% 46. Texas – 66% 47. Kentucky – 64.8% 48. Alaska – 63.6% 49. Arkansas – 58.5% 50. Montana – 22.5% 51. Vermont – 20.7%

Broadband Coverage by Metro

 

Top 25 Metros with Broadband Coverage

If you want to have a good chance of broadband coverage, then it would seem Washington State is one of the best places to live, with 5 metros in the top 25, followed by Florida with 4 metros and New York State with 3 metros. All three states are in the top 15 coverage states, so this should come as no surprise. 1. Myrtle Beach, SC – 1% 2. Kennewick, WA – 0.999% 3. Carson City, NV – 0.999% 4. Bridgeport, CT – 0.998% 5. Poughkeepsie, NY – 0.998% 6. New York, NY – 0.998% 7. Allentown, PA – 0.997% 8. Champaign Urbana, IL – 0.997% 9. Honolulu, HI – 0.997% 10. Providence, RI – 0.996% 11. Palm Bay, FL – 0.996% 12. Spokane, WA – 0.995% 13. Salt Lake City, UT – 0.994% 14. Bellingham, WA – 0.994% 15. Tampa, FL – 0.993% 16. Winston Salem, NC – 0.993% 17. Corvallis, OR – 0.993% 18. Seattle, WA – 0.993% 19. Buffalo, NY – 0.993% 20. Los Angeles, CA – 0.993% 21. Palm Coast, FL – 0.992% 22. Las Vegas, NV – 0.992% 23. Milwaukee, WI – 0.992% 24. Mt Vernon, WA – 0.991% 25. Orlando, FL – 0.991%

Worst 25 Metros with Broadband Coverage

More important than where to find broadband speeds may be to know which metros to avoid, with less than satisfactory speeds. Of the ~ 370 metros analyzed, 14 metros in Texas fell into the worst 25 broadband covered metros. In fairness, Texas is the second largest state in the USA, which means coverage can be difficult to some of the more rural areas in the state. Conversely, California only has one metro fall into the worst 25 covered metros, and is the largest state in the USA. Unfortunately, you will only find Los Angeles in the top 25 most covered metros, meaning the majority of California’s cities have relatively average broadband coverage. 1. Longview, TX – 0.503% 2. Visalia, CA – 0.483% 3. College Station, TX – 0.294% 4. Cumberland, MD – 0.288% 5. Killeen Temple, TX – 0.28% 6. Lubbock, TX – 0.258% 7. Missoula, MT – 0.25% 8. Billings, MT – 0.237% 9. Yuma, AZ – 0.228% 10. Burlington, VT – 0.219% 11. Abilene, TX – 0.2% 12. Tyler, TX – 0.196% 13. Amarillo, TX – 0.193% 14. San Angelo, TX – 0.171% 15. Grand Junction, CO – 0.149% 16. Hot Springs, AR – 0.09% 17. Great Falls, MT – 0.085% 18. El Paso, TX – 0.064% 19. Beaumont, TX – 0.041% 20. Wichita Falls, TX – 0.024% 21. McAllen, TX – 0.019% 22. Laredo, TX – 0.013% 23. Pittsfield, MA – 0.007% 24. Brownsville, TX – 0.006% 25. Pine Bluff, AZ – 0.001% All in all, there is a substantial variance in the amount of broadband coverage across the United States. The Northeast and West seem to be leading the charge on improving access to high speed internet for their residents. Want to see which providers are available in your area, and how they stack up against the rest of nation? Use our zip search below to get started. [zipfinder] Last December, we wrote about Huntsville, Alabama’s quest to become the next gig city. It wasn’t the next in line after Chattanooga, but when its new network comes online, it may be the best and fastest. Mayor Frank Battle mentioned fiber as an important piece of infrastructure for attracting new businesses to the area, and if Huntsville’s new lure is as shiny as the city claims, they may soon land some whoppers. That bait is a business-oriented 100 Gbps network, so let’s hope this tale isn’t just another fishing story. Too Good to Be True? Actually, the news gets better. Network builder Southern Light will construct a 120-mile fiber loop, and it claims the core of this network will support terabit-speed data transfers. It’s the branches from the main network that will only be capable of the 100-gig download speeds. If the new network delivers as promised, Huntsville could have the fastest Internet in the country. Those unfamiliar with local history might not know that the city was a pioneering community in one of the great technological advances of the last century. Huntsville is home to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, which played a critical role in developing the Saturn V rocket that sent American astronauts to the moon. It may not be a big city, but it’s hardly a backwater. If network building is rocket science, Huntsville has that covered. Trickle-down Connectivity As mentioned earlier, the network will be aimed at commercial subscribers because there’s probably not a lot of market for consumer 100 Gbps plans. It’s not that consumer subscribers wouldn’t want that kind of speed, but the price would likely be prohibitively expensive, at least at first. It’s difficult to imagine what the price tag for this connection would be. That said, Southern Light says it will allow other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to purchase access to the network, so it’s almost a certainty that at least one ISP will do so and offer consumer service. Assuming that’s the case, there’s no reason to assume the ISP couldn’t make—and this is a phrase we didn’t think we’d ever write—speeds in the low-gigabit range much more affordable. Backup Plans But in case that doesn’t happen for some reason, Huntsville continues to review more than a dozen consumer-oriented responses to its original request for proposals. That request specified gigabit speeds as a requirement, so it looks as if, one way or another, Huntsville residents will soon have a gigabit-capable network. False Modesty “Any bandwidth you see available in Los Angeles or New York or Washington, D.C., will be available here in Huntsville and Madison, on our network,” Southern Light’s CEO Andy Newton said. But that’s not really something to brag about. New York and California don’t have anywhere near this kind of speed. As we said in December, fiber is poised to be the new critical infrastructure for the coming century. If the new network proceeds as planned, residents of our unofficial West Coast and East Coast capitals might need to compare themselves to Huntsville, not the other way around. Odds are, you’re now comparing your own connection to what’s coming to Huntsville. No matter which service provider you have, they probably won’t win that comparison, but that doesn’t mean you have to settle. Enter your zip code below to find out what the best plan in your area is. [zipfinder] Photo Credit: David Ellis/Flikr
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