Best Powerline Network Adapters for Your Home

Best overallBest valueBest for Wi-Fi


TP-Link TL-PA9020P AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit TRENDnet TPL-407E 500 AV Powerline Nano AdapterD-Link COVR-P2502-US Wi-Fi Hybrid Powerlink Adapter
$89.99$39.99$185.43
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Bottom line: What powerline network adapter is best?

Overall, the TP-Link AV2000 is the best powerline adapter for most networks. Its two gigabit Ethernet ports and pass-through outlets maximize connectivity, and its plug-and-play setup makes it easy to get online.

Top powerline network adapters

ModelPriceEthernet portsWi-Fi capabilities
Best overallTP-Link TL-PA9020P$89.992NoView on Amazon
Best valueTRENDnet TPL-407E2K$39.991NoView on Amazon
Best for Wi-FiD-Link COVR-P2502$185.433YesView on Amazon
Best for budget Wi-FiTP-Link AV600$59.992YesView on Amazon
Best for speedZyxel PLA6456$94.991NoView on Amazon
Best overall
ModelTP-Link TL-PA9020P
Price$89.99
Ethernet ports2
Wi-Fi capabilitiesNo
View on Amazon
Best value
ModelTRENDnet TPL-407E2K
Price$39.99
Ethernet ports1
Wi-Fi capabilitiesNo
View on Amazon
Best for Wi-Fi
ModelD-Link COVR-P2502
Price$185.43
Ethernet ports3
Wi-Fi capabilitiesYes
View on Amazon
Best for budget Wi-Fi
ModelTP-Link AV600
Price$59.99
Ethernet ports2
Wi-Fi capabilitiesYes
View on Amazon
Best for speed
ModelZyxel PLA6456
Price$94.99
Ethernet ports1
Wi-Fi capabilitiesNo
View on Amazon

TP-Link TL-PA9020P AV2000 PowerLINE Adapter Kit

Best overall
  • Ports: 2 gigabit Ethernet
  • Wi-Fi: No
  • Passthrough outlet: Yes
  • Max speed: 2,000 Mbps
  • Expandable: Yes
  • MIMO: Yes

The TP-Link AV2000 powerline adapter is easy to use, offers fast speeds with its dual gigabit Ethernet ports, and doesn’t hog all your outlets. That makes it our pick for the best powerline adapter for your home network.

The kit comes with two devices. You connect the first one to your router with an Ethernet cable and plug in to a nearby outlet. You plug the second in to an outlet near your device. The TL-PA9020 can reach max internet speeds up to 2,000 Mbps within a range of 300 meters.

Pros

  • Two gigabit Ethernet ports
  • Pass-through outlet

Cons

  • No Wi-Fi connectivity

TRENDnet TPL-407E Powerline 500 AV Nano Adapter Kit

Best value
  • Ports: 1 Ethernet
  • Wi-Fi: No
  • Pass-through outlet: Yes
  • Max speed: 500 Mbps
  • Expandable: Yes
  • MIMO: No

This TRENDnet powerline adapter set can’t reach the same max speeds as some of the other devices on this list, but it’s an economical way to set up a wired internet connection in the far reaches of your home.

The TPL-407E supports network speeds up to 500 Mbps, but its Ethernet port supports speeds up to 100 Mbps, which limits the internet speeds to your actual device. That said, 100 Mbps is still more than enough bandwidth for most internet activities, like video streaming and gaming.

Pros

  • Inexpensive price
  • Pass-through outlet

Cons

  • May block adjacent outlets
  • Doesn’t have gigabit Ethernet port

D-Link COVR-P2502 Hybrid Whole Home Powerline Wi-Fi System

Best for Wi-Fi
  • Ports: 3 gigabit Ethernet
  • Wi-Fi: Yes, AC1200
  • Pass-through outlet: No
  • Max speed: 1,300 Mbps
  • Expandable: Yes
  • MIMO: Yes

D-Link’s COVR devices combine powerline and mesh networking to expand your wired and wireless internet reach. It’s the best option if you’re looking to stay connected to Wi-Fi as well as expand wired connection options.

The COVR devices support dual-band Wi-Fi with max speeds up to 1,200 Mbps and three gigabit Ethernet ports each for wired connections. The hybrid mesh technology keeps all devices connected to the same network and manages connections to keep your internet running smoothly in every corner of your home.

Pros

  • Hybrid powerline and mesh Wi-Fi
  • 3 gigabit Ethernet ports

Cons

  • No pass-through outlet

TP-Link TL-WPA4220 AV600 Powerline Wi-Fi Extender Kit

Best for budget Wi-Fi
  • Ports: 2 Ethernet
  • Wi-Fi: Yes, N300
  • Pass-through outlet: No
  • Max speed: 600 Mbps
  • Expandable: Yes
  • MIMO: No

The TL-WPA4220 is an easy, inexpensive way to push the limits of your wireless network. But like the TRENDnet powerline adapter, this TP-Link powerline system is limited by its lack of gigabit ports. The devices support data transfer rates of up to 600 Mpbs through your electrical wiring, but the wired connections to the devices are limited to 100 Mbps.

Wi-Fi fares a little better, as the TL-WPA4220 powerline Wi-Fi extender can handle speeds up to 300 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz band. That along with its plug-and-play setup make it a good, affordable option for low-effort wired and wireless network expansion.

Pros

  • Wi-Fi speeds up to 300 Mbps
  • Affordable price

Cons

  • Regular Ethernet ports

Zyxel PLA6456 G.hn 2400 Wave 2 Powerline Kit

Best for speed
  • Ports: 1 gigabit Ethernet
  • Wi-Fi: No
  • Pass-through outlet: Yes
  • Max speed: 2,400 Mbps
  • Expandable: Yes
  • MIMO: No

Most powerline network adapters work using AV standards, which use electrical wiring to transfer your data. The Zyxel PLA6456 uses a slightly different tech called G.hn, which can use four different types of wiring, including telephone wiring, coax cables, electrical wiring, and plastic optical fibers.

The G.hn tech gives Zyxel a slight performance edge over some other extenders because your internet signals have more (and sometimes better) pathways through your home. This product offers powerline speeds up to 2,400 Mbps. So if you’re looking to squeeze every last Mbps out of your home network, the Zyxel powerline kit is your best bet.

Pros

  • Pass-through outlet
  • Power save mode

Cons

  • Only 1 gigabit Ethernet port

What to look for in powerline network adapters

Most powerline network adapters on the market look the same and have many of the same features, so how do you choose?

Let’s make this easy. Unless you’re searching for something highly specific (in which case, you probably already know what you’re looking for), just make sure to look into these three things.

Speed

Make sure your powerline adapter supports speeds fast enough for what you want to do. This includes making sure your device uses networking standards that support fast speeds and has a gigabit Ethernet port if you need wired speeds above 100 Mbps.

If you go for a powerline adapter with Wi-Fi, check the Wi-Fi standard as well. Wireless ac (sometimes called Wi-Fi 5) is the current Wi-Fi standard, but wireless n (Wi-Fi 4) is still widely available in products as well.

Pro tip:

Choose which outlets you use for powerline networking carefully. Power strips, surge protectors, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS’s), AFCI outlets, and GFCI outlets can all negatively affect your powerline connection.

Pass-through power outlet

If you’re in a space where power outlets are in high demand, look for adapters with pass-through outlets. These devices let you keep the same number of working power outlets while maintaining your wired internet connections.

One word of caution here: many powerline adapters are bulky enough that they can block nearby outlets. If you need every outlet you can get, make sure your adapter of choice won’t take up too much space.

Internet connection types

Check your chosen powerline adapter’s connection types to make sure it’ll work with your devices. Basically, if you want Wi-Fi connections, make sure your powerline adapter works as a wireless access point. If you want wired connections to more than one device, make sure to get an adapter with multiple Ethernet ports.

Beyond the number of ports on your adapter, make sure to check the type of port as well. Some powerline adapters have fast Ethernet ports, which support speeds up to 100 Mbps. Gigabit Ethernet ports are standard and can handle up to 1,000 Mbps.

Our verdict

The TP-Link TL-PA9020P is our pick for the best powerline network adapter. It supports fast speeds, multiple connections, and pass-through power, which checks all our boxes. It’s a great option if you need one or two reliable wired internet connections but don’t want to run Ethernet cables through your whole house.

Buy it on Amazon

Powerline network adapter FAQ

Who should use powerline networking?

You should use a powerline adapter if most of your home network works fine, but you need a more reliable, wired connection for one or two devices. For example, a powerline connection would be great for the PC in your basement that never gets a reliable Wi-Fi signal.

But you shouldn’t rely on powerline networking for all your internet connections. Though most powerline kits are expandable and can work with multiple adapters, powerline networking isn’t a replacement for wiring your home with Ethernet if you need a bunch of wired connections.

What are the disadvantages of powerline network adapters?

Powerline adapters are amazing for specific circumstances, but they do have limitations. Some of the disadvantages of powerline network adapters are electrical interference, dependance on your home’s electrical wiring, outlet blocking, and expensive connections. We’ll explain more below.

Electrical interference

Appliances like refrigerators and microwaves can create a lot of electrical interference that messes up your powerline signal. One way to minimize electrical interference is to plug your powerline adapter into an outlet by itself.

Dependence on your home’s electrical wiring

Powerline network adapters use your home’s electrical wiring, so their performance can depend on things like the age of the wires. Some older homes can’t even support powerline networking. The only way to know for sure if powerline networking will or won’t work in your home is to try it and see.

Outlet blocking

While some powerline adapters have pass-through electrical outlets, many do not. And even devices with this feature can block other nearby outlets if it’s bulky enough (which many are).

Expensive connections

Most powerline adapters are meant to connect to only one or two devices. With each adapter set costing between $40 and $90, that gets expensive fast if you want more than one connection.

Author -

Rebecca is a natural techie and the friend you turn to when your Wi-Fi randomly stops working. Since graduating from the University of Evansville with a degree in creative writing, Rebecca has leveraged her tech savvy to write hundreds of data-driven tech product and service reviews. In addition to HighSpeedInternet.com, her work has been featured on Top Ten Reviews, MacSources, Windows Central, Android Central, Best Company, TechnoFAQ and iMore.

Editor - Cara Haynes

Cara Haynes has edited for HighSpeedInternet.com for three years, working with smart writers to revise everything from internet reviews to reports on your state’s favorite Netflix show. She believes no one should feel lost in internet land and that a good internet connection significantly extends your life span (buffering kills). With a degree in English and editing and five years working with online content, it’s safe to say she likes words on the internet. She is most likely to be seen wearing Birkenstocks and hanging out with a bouncy goldendoodle named Dobby, who is a literal fur angel sent to Earth.

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