Internet Speed Test

Is your internet fast enough? Test internet speeds at your location with a single click.

Learn More about Internet Speeds

Is your internet fast enough?

5 Mbps

  • Browsing
  • Streaming music
  • Ideal for single user

10 Mbps

  • Browsing
  • Streaming music
  • Ideal for single user

20 Mbps

  • Ultra HD streaming
  • Frequent gaming
  • Ideal for 2-4 people

40+ Mbps

  • Streaming multiple shows in HD
  • Simultaneous gaming
  • Ideal for 4+ people

Keep in mind that these download speeds and their associated activities are guidelines. The actual speeds required for each internet activity may vary.

Pro Tips:

  • For best results, connect your device directly to your modem with an Ethernet cable and shut down all other programs aside from the test. If your modem is also your router, you’ll need to turn off its Wi-Fi because it might cause interference.
  • Internet speeds fluctuate, so you should run the test three or four times to get an accurate average.

What do my internet speed test results mean?

Upload Speed

Upload speed is how fast your internet connection can send data to an internet server. Most internet activities don’t require much upload speed, but some do. However, if you participate in an activity that does require high upload speeds, you’ll definitely notice if your internet is too slow.

What kinds of internet activities require high upload speeds?

  • Online gaming (Xbox, PlayStation, etc.)
  • Video chat (Skype, FaceTime, etc.)
  • Sharing large files (torrenting, high-volume cloud storage, etc.)

Download Speed

Download speed is how fast your internet connection receives data from websites and other internet servers. Virtually all internet activities require download speed, but some use more than others. You’ll also need more download speed if you have multiple people using the internet at the same time. Keep both of these things in mind when choosing a speed that’s right for you.

What kinds of internet activities require high download speeds?

  • Streaming multiple videos at once
  • Streaming in 4K Ultra HD
  • Downloading large files
To learn more about the the differences between upload and download speeds, check out our Consumer's Guide to Internet Speed.

What internet speed do I need?

If your favorite show is buffering every two minutes while bingeing the new season, it’s a real fun killer. Getting the right internet speed will save you from that.

The amount of internet speed you need depends on how you use the internet and the number of devices connected to your network. We covered the activities that use a lot of bandwidth above, but the number of devices or users is just as important. The more users and devices you have, the more speed you’ll need.

To get the best speed recommendation, use our “How Much Speed Do I Need?” tool.

Why test your internet speed?

It could improve your internet experience.

Taking a speed test will tell you if your service is underperforming, and it can also troubleshoot issues on your network. If your internet speed test results are far lower than what you’re paying for, call your Internet Service Provider (ISP) to see if it can help you resolve the issue. If the problem persists, it may be time to switch ISPs.

You can also use a speed test to identify internet traffic patterns in your neighborhood. Try it during different times of the day and week to get a sense of when the most slowing occurs. Then you can use those patterns to plan your internet usage around high-traffic times.

It could save you money.

Paying for too much internet speed every month can cost you hundreds of dollars per year. If your speed test results are much higher than what you need, save money by switching to a less expensive package with a lower speed.

Do you have a business? Testing your internet speed is even more important for you.

Paying for more internet speed than your business needs isn’t smart. On the other hand, paying for internet that’s too slow hurts your business. Regular speed tests help you strike the right balance between speed and price.
If you’re ready to find a new internet plan, start by entering your zip to see the ISPs available in your area.

Why use our internet speed test?

Our internet speed test can access hundreds of internet servers around the world—most of them in the United States and Europe. When you start the speed test, it automatically selects the best server to execute the test based on your location.

Because we use a nearby server to execute the test, it keeps the results as accurate as possible. Internet tests that use distant servers can require your internet signal to travel farther than it normally would, making your results susceptible to interference and overblown ping rates.

How do internet speed tests work?

Different internet speed tests have different specifics, but the basic concepts are the same. To test download speed, the testing tool will downloads a file or set of files, then measures how long the download takes to completed. They measure upload speed the same way, except in reverse. Most speed tests also test ping rate because they’re contacting the server anyway.

Internet speeds will almost always seem a little slower than they should because of IP overhead.

Internet speeds will almost always seem a little slower than they should because of IP overhead.

Internet protocol (IP) is the set of procedures that make the internet work. Under these procedures, when you send a message over the internet, your computer first breaks it down into tiny pieces of data called IP packets. To make sure all the packets reach the correct location and can be put back together correctly, your computer attaches a set of routing and reassembly instructions, called the IP header, to each packet as it’s broken out.

The total data in the file you send plus the data in the IP header of each packet is called the payload. So, sending a 10-megabit message will have a payload that’s a little more than 10 megabits. That means downloading a 10-megabit file on a 10 Mbps internet connection, will take longer than one second because you have to download the entire payload, not just the file. The extra time needed to upload or download that extra data is called IP overhead.

Will security software affect my speed test?

Internet speed tests download dummy files to measure download speeds. If your security software detects those dummy files as potentially harmful (which they’re not), it may try to block them with a firewall or other security measures.

If this happens to you, try turning off your security software for the duration of the test. Just remember to turn it back on after the test is done.

Internet Speed Basics

Understanding the basics of internet speed jargon goes a long way when choosing or troubleshooting an internet service or networking hardware.

Transfer Rate
Transfer rate is the speed that digital information moves from one device to another. The transfer can happen online or through a direct connection between offline devices. Internet speed, bit rate, and data rate are all technically transfer rates, but the term “transfer rate” usually refers to a data rate. Transfer rates, including internet speeds, bit rates, and data rates, are all commonly measured in megabits per second (Mbps). However, if a transfer rate is slower, it may be measured in kilobits per second (Kbps). Conversely, faster transfer rates may be measured in gigabits per second (Gbps).
Internet Speed
Internet speed refers to how fast digital information travels through your internet connection. Internet speeds fluctuate, but with regular testing you can establish a base range. Internet speed is a type of transfer rate and is usually measured as a data rate in megabits per second (Mbps).
Bit Rate
Bit rate is the speed that digital information moves from one device to another at any given moment as it’s happening. Bit rates can fluctuate, depending on the configuration of the data being transferred.
Data Rate
Data rate is the overall speed that a given set of digital information moves from one device to another. A set of digital information is all the data needed to complete one transfer. If the information in a set were transferred evenly, the bit rate and data rate would be the same. If the bit rate fluctuated during the transfer, it could be different from the data rate, depending on when it was measured.
Bandwidth
Bandwidth refers to the total transfer capacity of an internet connection. When Internet Service Providers (ISPs) advertise their connection speeds, they’re really talking about the bandwidth of their connections. That’s why they always say “up to” a given speed. That top speed occurs only when the connection is running at full capacity.
Throughput
Throughput is the amount of information that passes through an internet connection or other data transfer point within a given time frame. It’s similar to data rate, but it’s a measurement of volume, not speed.
Latency / Lag
Latency refers to the time a signal takes to travel between your internet connection and the nearest (or designated) internet server.
Ping
Ping is the name given to a test signal sent from a location on a network to the network server and back.
Ping Rate
Ping rate is the time it takes for a ping to travel to an internet server and back. It is the measurement of latency.

Pro Tip:

While latency, lag, ping, and ping rate all refer to slightly different aspects of the same phenomenon, they are often used interchangeably to refer to the whole concept of latency.
Bits

Bits are the basic unit of digital information. They are represented in binary code as a one or a zero.

Kilobit (Kb) = 1,000 bits

Megabit (Mb) = 1 million bits

Gigabit (Gb) = 1 billion bits

Bytes

A byte is eight bits. Measurements usually use bit-based measurements like those listed above. Data is usually measured in byte-based measurements. For example, you may see an ISP offer an internet service with 25 Mbps downloads and a data cap of 8 GB. That’s a download speed of twenty-five megabits per second and a monthly data allowance of eight gigabytes.

Kilobyte (KB) = 1,000 bytes

Megabytes (MB) = 1 million bytes

Gigabyte (GB) = 1 billion bytes

The amount of data that moves through a connection in one second defines the connection’s internet speed. Those speeds are usually expressed as megabits per second (Mbps), but the fastest networks use Gbps.

Kbps—kilobits per second

Mbps—megabits per second

Gbps—Gigabits per second

Internet Speed Conversion Chart

=bpsBpsKbpsKBpsMbpsMBpsGbpsGBps
1 Kbps1,0001251.125.001.000125.000001.000000125
1 KBps8,0001,00081.008.001.000008.000001
1 Mbps1M125,0001,0001251.125.001.000125
1 MBps8M1M8,0001,00081.008.001
1 Gbps1B125M1M125,0001,0001251.125
1 GBps8B1B8M1M8,0001,00081

Learn more about internet speed

To learn more about internet speed and related topics like home networking, IP addresses, and the different types of internet, see “The Consumer’s Guide to Internet Speed.

Compare ISPs available in your area and the speeds they offer by entering your zip.

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