Time Warner Cable vs. Verizon Internet

If you’re trying to pick between Time Warner Cable and Verizon internet, you’ve come to the right place. Each provider’s strengths and weaknesses differ, which can make it hard to easily distinguish which company will give you the type of internet service you need. This quick overview and comparison will help eliminate some of that confusion. Time Warner Cable (TWC) is one of the largest providers in the U.S., serving close to 12.7 million internet customers. Additionally, as of 2016, TWC is a division of Charter Communications, which may help expand the company’s services beyond its current 29-state reach. Verizon, on the other hand, is widely known for its wireless cellphone service and fiber-optic internet, Fios. The company’s internet services reach 13 states, and as of the beginning of 2015, Verizon serves 7 million internet customers, 1.9 million of which are DSL subscribers. Before taking a closer look at how the two providers stack up, note this: TWC and Verizon provide two different types of internet services. TWC is a cable internet provider, meaning the connection operates over existing cable television lines that run through your neighborhood. Verizon High-Speed Internet — not to be confused with Verizon Fios — is a DSL service that runs over copper-based phone lines, so you’ll be the only customer using it. Though the latter individual internet line sounds appealing, DSL is actually much slower than cable — and much cheaper. In the digital age of ever-increasing bandwidth demands, you want a plan that’s not only affordable but reliable, too. We’ve given you side-by-side comparisons of both internet brands, so you can make the...

20 Best Cities to Bootstrap an Online Business

  Trying to get your start-up to stay afloat in an online sea of competition? Many bootstrapped startups make the mistake of launching locally without considering whether their city has the resources and the support to ensure success. Others jump into the seemingly obvious – and prohibitively expensive – choice for an online-centered tech company: The San Francisco Bay area. We’ve taken a hard look at cities around the country to determine the optimal location for your online business, where you can have the best of both worlds. Startups are often strapped for cash, so we’ve focused our selection criteria on affordability and a lower cost of living, as well as access to a highly educated workforce. You’ll notice that many of the cities that made our list are located in the suburbs of a major metro area, where an online business can still get speedy internet without paying big city rents. Watch out, Palo Alto. Your tech talent might get tired of the traffic and move to Des Moines. While some of the data we utilized is detailed below, please note that we also considered factors such as clean air, walkability, politics, and much more. So start packing boxes and take your business to one of the following cities, where you’ll have a better chance of making a start-up successful. “Low cost, high quality of living.  There are plenty of places that are cheap, but don’t have many resources available, and there are plenty of places that have high quality of living, but are too expensive.  Finding the right tradeoff of the two, having high quality of living...
15 Free Apps for Students That Should be on Your Smartphone

15 Free Apps for Students That Should be on Your Smartphone

Headed back to school? If you’re a student, you shouldn’t go anywhere without these free apps that make studying for school simple. Students everywhere are busy stocking up on supplies as they head back to school this month. If you’re a college student, you might be looking to score some sweet deals on textbooks or a Keurig that’ll make those late-night study sessions survivable. Don’t forget, though, that some of the most important tools and resources are available online for a song. These 15 apps are free, top-rated resources that’ll help you score the right notes. Yep. We said FREE—a word that is certainly music to a starving student’s ears. Each section below highlights apps from a particular category, along with a short description, fun feature, and links to download these student-friendly apps directly to your smartphone. And every one of these electronic resources are well-established favorites that have received four stars or more in user reviews in the app store. So get ready to learn a thing or two with virtual tools designed with the cash-strapped student in mind.   Books & Resources   Scrib’d Readers rejoice. This free app is one of the best e-readers around. While you’ll have to pay a subscription fee for access to the books, it’s a terrific value. A monthly fee of $8.99 gets you access to any three electronic books and one audio book, plus freebies like sheet music, comic books, and documents. Fun Feature: The editor recommendations are like having a librarian in your pocket. Get it Now: iTunes Store, Google Play   Coursera If you’re not really what sure...
Google Pivots from Fiber to 5G

Google Pivots from Fiber to 5G

Alphabet puts Google Fiber development on hold in several cities to explore wireless alternatives   Feel like it’s taking Google Fiber forever to find its way into your neighborhood? You’re not alone. Cities across America have been waiting patiently for Alphabet, Google Fiber’s parent company, to begin building the infrastructure that’ll bring high-speed internet home. But thus far, it’s been an exercise in frustration for both sides. In six years, Google has managed to establish their inexpensive fiber networks in just six cities scattered across America. At this rate, we’ll be crawling into the network speeds needed to sustain innovation a century too late. What’s the hold up? Fiber Failures It’s possible that Google may have underestimated the difficulty of breaking into the hundred-year-old telecommunications industry. Just a little. While some speculate that Google’s bid to launch fiber was simply a bluff to nudge providers to increase broadband speeds, the endeavor extended a promise to municipalities that Google is struggling to deliver. Development of fiber networks by Google in over 16 cities has stumbled and stalled based on two major roadblocks: 1. Expensive Infrastructure It’s costly and excruciatingly slow to dig up yards and streets to install the infrastructure needed to deliver high-speed internet. It’s estimated that in Portland, one of the cities that Google has been exploring bringing fiber to for several years, it would take nearly 300 million dollars to cover the last mile and create connected homes. That’s a hunk of change even Google might hesitate over. 2. Legislative Limbo While 60 percent of the potential fiber infrastructure exists underground, roughly 40 percent utilizes utility poles....

XFINITY by Comcast vs. Verizon Fios

You just want the fastest speeds at the most affordable price. Why does it have to be so difficult to pick a high-speed internet provider? At HSI, we don’t think it has to be. We’ll give you side by side brand comparisons with a complete breakdown on services, equipment, and satisfaction ratings so you can make the best decision for your connected home. Should you choose Xfinity by Comcast or Verizon Fios as your high-speed internet service provider? As with most things, it depends on what you’re looking for. Comcast is the largest cable provider in the U.S., serving roughly 113 million customers across 39 states. This telecom behemoth operates a coaxial cable network that delivers high-speed internet, TV, phone and home security services under the brand name XFINITY. Verizon operates a fiber network that is one of the largest in the United States, providing internet, TV and phone service to over 5 million customers in nine states. Verizon is also the largest wireless telecommunications provider in the United States. As we look at side-by-side comparisons of these two industry leaders, keep in mind that this is also a comparison of two different types of service. Fiber technology differs from cable in that it offers superior speeds and a more efficient delivery, but it comes at a cost. Your choice will depend on which type of service works well for your household and what your service priorities are.   Customer Satisfaction Comparisons XFINITY Internet Overall customer rating (3.37 / 5)   VIEW PLANS   Verizon Fios Internet Overall customer rating (3.84 / 5)   VIEW PLANS   Installation &...
How to Stream the Summer Olympic Games

How to Stream the Summer Olympic Games

As the pageantry of the Olympics rolls into Rio, you may be searching for ways you can stream coverage. Accessing a live feed can be a tricky—but not impossible—endeavor that requires some technological gymnastics on your part. Because the games have an exclusive broadcaster, in this case NBC, that holds rights over all Olympic programming and content, many cord cutters get left out of the loop. There are a few ways you can sneak in the sights and sounds of the summer games in Rio, however, even if you don’t have traditional cable. Got a Login? You’re Good to Go! If you’ve managed to get your hands on a cable TV login (I won’t ask how. Not my circus, not my monkeys.), then you can download the NBC TV Everywhere app and stream content from NBC and all of its affiliate networks. The app allows you to utilize streaming feeds on all your mobile devices, but you can also download it to your ROKU or computer. On a separate (but related) note, Comcast, DirecTV, and Dish are providing plenty of Olympic coverage in dazzling Ultra HD 4K, but you’ll need an HD set-box, a compatible HD TV, and service from one of the aforementioned cable providers to tune in. In some cases, like the opening ceremony, the HD programming will be broadcast on a delayed schedule so you’ll have to wait to enjoy the spectacle that is Rio. Patience, people. Tune in Old School Remember those wire things that protrude from the top of rickety old TV sets? What are those things anyway? They’re antennae and you can rig...

States with High Voter Turnout Have More Internet Access

  Whether you’re living on Planet Trump or firmly planted in Camp Hillary, voting in the next election could be vital to bridging the digital divide. In the 2012 presidential election, it was estimated that only 57.5% of the eligible U.S. population came out to vote. States that have a high voter participation rate also have a higher number of internet users, and while internet access does not fully depend on voter turnout, elected officials could help areas that need broadband access the most. HSI has created a map that estimates the percentage of 2016 internet users, using data from Internet World Stats, to see the correlation with the voter participation rate from 2012.   Top 5 States: Highest voter turnout, highest % of Internet users Wisconsin Voter Turnout: 72.9% Internet Users: 94.3% New Hampshire Voter Turnout: 70.9% Internet Users: 99.9% Maine Voter Turnout: 69.3% Internet Users: 94.1% Massachusetts Voter Turnout: 66.2% Internet Users: 98% Washington Voter Turnout: 65.8% Internet Users: 97.4% Bottom 5 States: Lowest voter turnout, lowest % of Internet users West Virginia Voter Turnout: 46.3% Internet Users: 80.1% Oklahoma Voter Turnout: 49.2% Internet Users: 77.2% Texas Voter Turnout: 49.6% Internet Users: 78% Arkansas Voter Turnout: 51.1% Internet User: 75.9% New Mexico Voter Turnout: 54.8% Internet Users: 77.3%   States that Need Internet Access the Most Places with high poverty and unemployment rates need help bridging the digital divide. Generally, people who live in the deep south, rural areas, or low income neighborhoods are falling behind in education, jobs, and technological literacy due to lack of broadband access. Mississippi has the least amount of internet users in the...
The Digital Nomad: A Brief History of Remote Workers

The Digital Nomad: A Brief History of Remote Workers

Today’s workforce looks different than it did just a decade ago. Cubicle farms and 9-to-5 schedules are no longer the norm for Americans — the market for digital nomads and remote workers has burgeoned. According to GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com, half of the U.S. workforce works from home during part of the week and many Fortune 1000 companies have shed costly office space in favor of remote employees. Remote jobs available on FlexJobs rose by 26% from 2014 to 2015. Below is a look at other people, efforts, and companies that have impacted the growth of the remote workforce over the last four decades.   The Ultimate Timeline of Remote Working 1973: Jack Nilles coined the term “telecommuting” — using electronics to work remotely. Nilles referred to his work as a NASA engineer as telecommuting, and he estimated the style of work would be the norm in 10 or 20 years. 1982: Telecommuting expert Gil Gordon began his consulting business for companies wishing to start telecommuting programs. Over the next couple of decades, Gordon held multiple telecommuting conferences, published a regular newsletter, co-authored two books, and created management videos — all to promote best telecommuting practices. 1990: The city of Los Angeles established a Telecommuting Pilot Project from 1990 to 1992 that allowed over 400 city employees to work remotely. The goal of the project was to reduce air pollution and traffic as well as to increase productivity and qualified job candidates. 1991: Transportation engineer Patricia Mokhtarian published her first article on remote work, “Defining Telecommuting.” An early pioneer of telecommuting, Mokhtarian published many articles on how telecommunications technology impacts travel behavior...
The FCC Begins to Forge the Foundation for 5G

The FCC Begins to Forge the Foundation for 5G

The future of wireless broadband just got a little brighter last week when the Federal Communications Commission announced plans for the development of 5G networks. Tom Wheeler indicated that this might be “the most important decision” the FCC makes this year. We know what you’re thinking – 4G? LTE? 5G? Sounds like we’re running out of alphabet. What’s the big deal anyway? Let’s take a brief dive into what 5G is, what it could do for the future of wireless in America, and why the FCC’s ruling matters to you. “The United States will be the first country in the world to open up high-band spectrum for 5G networks and applications. And that’s damn important because it means U.S. companies will be first out of the gate.” Tom Wheeler, FCC Chairman   What is 5G? 5G stands for “fifth generation,” and it indicates an advanced set of standards for how wireless networks operate. Currently, most networks utilize 4G and, until recently, this meant operating in a frequency spectrum below 24GHZ. A recent ruling by the FCC opens up the frequency spectrum above 24GHZ for auction to providers who would like to usher in a next generation wireless network. Previously, frequencies above 24GHZ were considered unusable given the current technology because the wavelengths were short and as a result, signal loss was too great. At higher frequencies, signals tend to be easily blocked, making reception indoors and over longer distances problematic. However, advances in technology and the ability to construct networks from smaller cells may be able to address these concerns within the next year. 5G wireless broadband would mean consumers...