Best Routers for Xfinity 2022

We selected the best five out of a dozen tested routers we think are ideal for Xfinity’s cable internet.

  • Best overall
    TP Link Archer AX1100
    TP-Link Archer AX11000
    • $256.86*
    • Free antivirus
    • Ready for multigig internet
    • No real gaming tools
  • Best for multigig
    Archer AX6000
    TP-Link Archer AX6000
    • $261.70*
    • Free antivirus
    • Ready for multigig internet
    • No third band
  • Best for budgets
    TP Link Archer AX20
    TP-Link Archer AX20
    • $79.99*
    • Free antivirus
    • Great low price
    • Limited features
  • Best for gamers
    NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200
    NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200
    • $425.00*
    • Blazing Wi-Fi speeds
    • Ready for multigig internet
    • High cost
  • Best for mesh
    TP-Link Deco X55 Review
    TP-Link Deco X55
    • $279.00*
    • Great look
    • Decent speeds
    • Subscription features

Our pick: Which router for Xfinity is best?

The TP-Link Archer AX11000 is our pick for the best router you can use with Xfinity’s cable internet service. It’s not the fastest router we’ve tested to date, but it’s great for a busy home and packs loads of extra features like free antivirus, free parental controls, and plenty of ports for wired connections. If you want a router with a bit more speed, the Archer AX6000 is a great alternative.

How we test routers

We vigorously test routers to see how well they stack up against the competition in speed and range. We also evaluate the setup process and dig into the web and mobile apps to see if they’re easy or difficult to use. Check out our methodology section for more information.

The 5 best routers for Xfinity

Compare gaming router speeds and prices

ModelImageMax throughputPriceOrder online
Best overallTP-Link Archer AX1100011,000 Mbps$256.86View on Amazon
Best for multigigTP-Link Archer AX60006,000 Mbps$261.70View on Amazon
Best for budgetsTP-Link Archer AX201,800 Mbps$79.99View on Amazon
Best for gamersNETGEAR Nighthawk RAX20011,000 Mbps$425.00View on Amazon
Best for meshTP-Link Deco X553,000 Mbps$279.99View on Amazon

What should you look for in a router for Xfinity?

Unlike cable modems, you don’t need a specific router for Xfinity’s cable internet. But if you have Xfinity’s Gigabit Extra (or just Gigabit, depending on where you live) plan, you need a router with a 2.5 Gbps WAN port or one that supports link aggregation for a 2 Gbps connection to the modem. Which method you choose to use depends on the modem you have now, but both methods support Xfinity’s 1.2 Gbps cable internet speeds.

We also prefer Wi-Fi 6 over the older Wi-Fi 5 standard, as it supports more devices, enables faster Wi-Fi speeds, and handles data more efficiently. Newer client devices like smartphones, tablets, and laptops support Wi-Fi 6, but even if you have a Wi-Fi 5 device now, you’ll have a Wi-Fi 6 router ready with faster speeds when you eventually upgrade.

Do you have the best Xfinity plan?

If your cable internet feels too slow for your needs, you may need a faster plan. Click the button below to see the Xfinity plans available to you.

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Best overall—TP-Link Archer AX11000

Best overall

TP-Link Archer AX11000 hands-on

The best solution for multigig cable internet

Score:

4

out of 5

You can’t go wrong with the Archer AX11000, even if you aren’t a gamer. It’s rather bold in appearance, sure, but it has decent speeds, free antivirus and parental controls, and enough wired options to free up the airwaves tablets, smartphones, and laptops.
   Pros    Cons
  • Multigig internet compatibility
  • Loads of wired connectivity
  • Wi-Fi 6 speeds
  • Boring web interface
  • No printer sharing

Price: $256.86*

Expand for product details and ratings

Category Score* Summary
Performance 4 Falls behind the Archer AX6000 and Archer AX90, but it’s on par with the similar ASUS ROG Rapture GT-AX11000.
Features 4 Includes a freeTP-Link HomeCare subscription for the life of the router.
Design 4 Provides loads of wired connectivity, multigig internet support, three bands, and plenty of streams to help relieve congestion.
Setup 4 Has a quick and easy setup, so your network is online in no time.
Ease of use 4 Employs a decent easy-to-use web interface but a better experience through the Tether app.

*out of 5 points

What we like about it: This wasn’t the fastest router in our tests— it fell slightly behind TP-Link’s own Archer AX6000 and AX90 models. But there’s a lot to love here for the price: free antivirus and parental controls, a 2.5 Gbps WAN port, link aggregation if your modem doesn’t have a 2.5 Gbps port, and loads of wired connectivity.

What we wish it did better: It’s missing a few features offered by the similar ASUS ROG Rapture GT-AX11000: a VPN client, printer sharing, support for Google Assistant, and real gaming tools.

Why do we recommend it? Sure, the AX11000 caters to gamers, but we also list this router as our top pick for other categories. You get a lot of bang for your buck, and it’s a great alternative to the Nighthawk RAX200 if you don’t want to spend that kind of money on a router.

 

Wi-Fi specs Wired specs
  • Standard: Wi-Fi 6
  • Max throughput: 11,000 Mbps
  • Antennas: 8
  • Streams: 12
  • Bands: 3
  • WAN ports (1–2.5 Gbps): 1
  • LAN ports: 8
  • USB 3.2 ports: 2

Best for multigig—TP-Link Archer AX6000

Best for multigig

NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200

A great alternative for multigig internet

Score:

3.9

out of 5

The AX6000 is an awesome router for the money, although it lacks the third band and extra streams offered with the Archer AX11000. It has great Wi-Fi speeds, great range, and plenty of wired ports, so you can give your smartphones and tablets more Wi-Fi room to breathe.
   Pros    Cons
  • Great Wi-Fi 6 speeds
  • Free antivirus and parental controls
  • Mediocre web interface
  • Two bands only

Price: $261.70*

Expand for product details and ratings

Category Score* Summary
Performance 4 Tested third fastest Wi-Fi 6 speeds to date, falling behind NETGEAR’s Nighthawk RAX200 for gamers and the Archer AX90.
Features 4 Includes a VPN server and client, printer sharing, and a free subscription to HomeCare for the life of the router.
Design 4 Packs a 2.5 Gbps WAN port, loads of wired connectivity, and link aggregation.
Setup 3 Takes longer than it should compared to the tested setup times on competing routers.
Ease of use 4 Offers a better experience through the Tether app than the web interface.

*out of 5 points

What we like about it: This router had better Wi-Fi 6 speeds than our top pick in testing but fell behind the Archer AX90 and NETGEAR’s Nighthawk RAX200 powerhouse. Like the Archer AX11000, this router has loads of wired connectivity, a 2.5 Gbps WAN port, and TP-Link’s free HomeCare suite, but it lacks the third Wi-Fi band.

What we wish it did better: We didn’t choose this router as our top pick only because it’s limited to two Wi-Fi bands and eight streams. We also wish the web interface had a dark mode, but that’s true for all TP-Link routers, not just this one.

Why do we recommend it? It’s a great alternative to the Archer AX11000. It’s faster and adds a few extra features, plus it has a great range—a tested 360 Mbps at 110 feet outside across the street.

 

Wi-Fi specs Wired specs
  • Standard: Wi-Fi 6
  • Max throughput: 6,000 Mbps
  • Antennas: 8
  • Streams: 8
  • Bands: 2
  • WAN ports (2.5 Gbps): 1
  • LAN ports: 8
  • USB 3.2 ports: 2

Best for budgets—TP-Link Archer AX20

Best for budgets

TP Link Archer AX20
Photo by Anastasia Hrivnak

A good, speedy solution for under $100

Score:

3.75

out of 5

You don’t normally get a ton of features for under $100, but the Archer AX20 has plenty to offer. It has decent Wi-Fi 6 speeds for the money, but the low stream count and solo gigabit WAN port limit your total bandwidth.
   Pros    Cons
  • Good speeds for the price
  • Built-in VPN server and client
  • Limited number of streams
  • No HomeCare support

Price: $79.99*

Expand for product details and ratings

Category Score* Summary
Performance 4 Has the lowest Wi-Fi 6 speeds in our standalone router tests, but that’s expected for the price.
Features 4 Includes a built-in VPN server and client along with basic parental controls.
Design 3 Lacks more than two streams per band, so congestion is an issue.
Setup 3 Gets your network running quickly, but could be faster.
Ease of use 4 Provides a better experience through the Tether app than it does through the web interface.

*out of 5 points

What we like about it: The AX20 is an upgrade to the cheaper and slower A10 model, and it offers decent speeds for the money based on our data and video tests. It doesn’t support TP-Link’s free HomeCare suite, but you get parental controls, a built-in VPN server and client, and Amazon Alexa support.

What we wish it did better: The 5 GHz band needs four streams at least, as the more devices you add to the band, the more latency and slower speeds you see. Unfortunately, options at this price point are limited.

Why do we recommend it? The AX20 is a good router for the money, especially for homes with very few devices. The built-in VPN and client components are a plus, and the free parental controls help keep your kids safe online.

 

Wi-Fi specs Wired specs
  • Standard: Wi-Fi 6
  • Max throughput: 1,800 Mbps
  • Antennas: 4
  • Streams: 4
  • Bands: 2
  • WAN ports: 1
  • LAN ports: 4
  • USB 2.0 ports: 1

Best for gamers—NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200

Best for gamers

NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200
Photo by Kevin Parrish

The best gigabit-ready speed demon you can get

Score:

4

out of 5

If speed is what you need, the Nighthawk RAX200 delivers. It has the fastest Wi-Fi 6 speeds we’ve tested to date—even at long range up to 160 feet. Plus, it supports internet connections up to 2.5 Gbps.
   Pros    Cons
  • Fastest Wi-Fi 6 speeds
  • Awesome range
  • Hefty price
  • Requires multiple accounts

Price: $425.00*

Expand for product details and ratings

Category Score* Summary
Performance 5 Has the best Wi-Fi 6 speeds we’ve tested to date, even at long range up to 160 feet.
Features 2 Locks security, VPN features, and parental controls behind separate subscriptions.
Design 3 Includes a 2.5 Gbps port you can use for the internet along with port aggregation for 2 Gbps WAN and LAN connections.
Setup 2 Takes a long time to get your network up and running.
Ease of use 5 Provides a great app experience but a clunky and ugly web interface.

*out of 5 points

What we like about it: The RAX200 is the fastest router we’ve tested to date, which also recorded a 20 Mbps average outside by the mailbox (160 feet). You can set it up for 2.5 Gbps internet via the WAN/LAN port or 2 Gbps internet using link aggregation. You can also use two other ports for a 2 Gbps LAN connection to a NAS or local gaming server.

What we wish it did better: We don’t like paying a lot of money for a router only to pay even more each month for services we can get for free on other routers. That’s our only complaint here.

Why do we recommend it? If speed and long range are what you need, then this is the router to get. The price is lower now that you can get the newer RAXE500 mode, making the RAX200 even more enticing if you’re willing to shell out the big bucks.

 

Wi-Fi specs Wired specs
  • Standard: Wi-Fi 6
  • Max throughput: 11,000 Mbps
  • Antennas: 8
  • Streams: 12
  • Bands: 3
  • WAN ports (1 Gbps): 1
  • LAN ports (1 Gbps): 4
  • WAN/LAN port (1–2.5 Gbps): 1
  • USB 3.2 ports: 2

Best for mesh—TP-Link Deco X55

Best for mesh

TP-Link Deco X55
Photo by Kevin Parrish

An attractive mesh alternative with decent speeds

Score:

3.75

out of 5

The Deco X55 is an attractive, affordable mesh kit that does a good job filling your home with Wi-Fi. But unlike TP-Link’s standalone routers, some features require a subscription.
   Pros    Cons
  • Decent Wi-Fi 6 speeds
  • Attractive design
  • Subscription-locked features
  • Requires a TP-Link ID

Price: $279.99*

Expand for product details and ratings

Category Score* Summary
Performance 4 Falls behind the Amazon Eero Pro 6 in Wi-Fi 6 speed, and behind Google Wifi in Wi-Fi 5 speeds.
Features 3 Locks notable security and parental controls behind the HomeShield Pro subscription.
Design 4 Features a gorgeous design that looks good in any environment.
Setup 3 Requires a TP-Link ID account to set up and use this kit.
Ease of use 4 Employs an intuitive app interface once you understand how it works.

*out of 5 points

What we like about it: The Deco X55 doesn’t match the speeds of the Eero Pro 6, but it’s also substantially cheaper, which we like. The three Ethernet ports are a plus. You can use one as a backroad to increase throughput on the two satellite units.

What we wish it did better: We wish it had the same three-band setup as the Eero Pro 6 for better speeds, but that would increase the price. This kit also would benefit from the free features of HomeCare instead of locking security and parental controls behind the HomeShield Pro subscription.

Why do we recommend it? The Deco X55 is an attractive kit with decent speeds for a decent price. It has a few shortcomings, sure, but it’s far cheaper than Amazon’s Eero Pro 6 and faster than the more expensive Google Wifi kit.

 

Wi-Fi specs Wired specs
  • Standard: Wi-Fi 6
  • Max throughput: 3,000 Mbps
  • Antennas: 2 internal per unit
  • Streams: 4
  • Bands: 2
  • WAN ports: 1 per unit
  • LAN ports: 2 per unit

Xfinity router specs and features

You don’t need a router with specific features for it to work with Xfinity’s cable internet. The only roadblock you might see is with Xfinity’s Gigabit plan and the type of modem or gateway you have.

Wi-Fi 6

We’ll always tell you to choose Wi-Fi 6 over Wi-Fi 5. The newer standard offers better battery longevity, better data management, and faster speeds on compatible devices.

Wi-Fi 6 supports more devices simultaneously too, providing up to eight or more streams one way, so your devices do less bandwidth sharing. Beamforming directs those beams to your device, so you’re not waving it around like a flag for better reception.

Multiple wired ports

The more wired ports you have, the better, and here’s why.

Imagine a smart TV, four gaming consoles, an Apple TV media streamer, Chromecast Ultra, Echo Dot, Google Home Mini, a couple of smartphones, a laptop, and maybe a tablet. That’s a lot of devices, right? I just described my TV room, and every device wants access to the 5 GHz Wi-Fi band.

Now let’s add all the other devices in the home: smartphones, smart appliances, media streamers—they all pile onto the 5 GHz band like a mob of zombies. Speed decreases, and latency increases for each wireless device. We already know you don’t need a lot of speed for gaming, streaming video and music, but all those devices and their bandwidth needs over Wi-Fi add up.

By offsetting devices like consoles, media streamers, and smart TVs to wired connections, you clear the airwaves for devices that don’t support wired, like smartphones and tablets. Everything still munches on your overall internet bandwidth, but your Wi-Fi connections won’t have to share streams when you binge-watch TikTok, Stranger Things season 4, and Obi-Wan Kenobi (guilty).

Multigig ports

For Xfinity’s Gigabit cable internet plan, you’ll need a router with one of the following:

  1. A single 2.5 Gbps internet port (WAN) or
  2. A router that links a standard 1 Gbps WAN port with a 1 Gbps LAN port.

For example, NETGEAR’s Nighthawk RAX200 supports both configurations. If you have a modem that supports 2 Gbps using link aggregation, you pair the WAN port with LAN 1 on the router. If the modem has a 2.5 Gbps port, use the router’s dedicated 2.5 Gbps port (LAN 5)—just make sure it’s set to that speed and purpose in the interface.

Three Wi-Fi bands

The typical router provides one 2.4 GHz connection and one 5 GHz connection, each with a 2×2 stream configuration at the very least. Every device you add to the 5 GHz connection increases the load on the radio used to transmit and receive on that band.

A third band adds more Wi-Fi bandwidth, reducing the congestion and load caused on dual-band routers. By default, some routers have one 5 GHz band configured for lower channels (20 Mhz, 40 MHz) and a second 5 GHz band with higher channels (80 MHz, 160 MHz).

On Wi-Fi 6E routers, the third connection uses the 6 GHz band instead of 5 GHz, enabling faster speeds but at even shorter distances. But you need a compatible Wi-Fi 6E client device to access this band—Wi-Fi 6 devices can’t see it.

Our verdict

We love the TP-Link Archer AX11000 for various categories, so it shouldn’t be surprising that we list it here as our top pick. It packs three bands, 12 streams, eight LAN ports, a 2.5 Gbps internet port, and the free HomeCare security suite. It’s not exactly cheap, we get it, and it’s not the fastest router we’ve tested to date, but there’s a lot here to love for the money. The AX6000 model is slightly faster for less money, but you lose that third band offered on the AX11000. Decisions decisions.

Methodology

We test router speed by setting up each router in an office and connecting it to a local test server. Then, we transmit test data between our wireless devices and the server, taking numerous measurements to account for fluctuations in Wi-Fi speeds.

The first tests occur close to the router, without obstructions—so the Wi-Fi is as strong and fast as it’s gonna get. We repeat the process straight out at 10, 20, and 30 feet, with only a glass door obstructing our view of the router. The same glass door and an exterior door blocks our path when we test outside at 40 and 50 feet.

We also run tests in a hallway to the left of the TV room and office—where there’s a glass door, three walls, and an air handler unit blocking our view of the router. The dining room, another testing point, sits to the right of the kitchen, TV room, and office—two walls and a glass door block the path in this test.

To test video streaming, we connect a fast storage device to the router and stream a 4K video to six wireless devices simultaneously—two phones, three tablets, and a laptop—connected to the same wireless band.

Client devices used in testing

iPhone 12 Pro MaxGoogle Pixel 3
Wi-Fi specificationWi-Fi 6Wi-Fi 5
Stream configuration2 x 22 x 2
Max 5 GHz speed (AX)1,200 Mbps
Max 5 GHz speed (AC)866 Mbps866 Mbps
Max 2.4 GHz speed (AX)195 Mbps
Max 2.4 GHz speed (AC)195 Mbps144 Mbps

Router benchmarks

Here are the average 5 GHz speeds recorded for each router. Wi-Fi speeds fluctuate significantly, so these numbers reflect at least three tests taken at each 10-foot interval.

TP-Link Archer AX11000

2 feet10 feet20 feet30 feet
iPhone 12 Pro Max820769700648
Google Pixel 3599543477382

TP-Link Archer AX6000

2 feet10 feet20 feet30 feet
iPhone 12 Pro Max849832782721
Google Pixel 3621576459413

TP-Link Archer AX20

2 feet10 feet20 feet30 feet
iPhone 12 Pro Max809741653542
Google Pixel 3620540415327

NETGEAR Nighthawk RAX200

2 feet10 feet20 feet30 feet
iPhone 12 Pro Max880864833750
Google Pixel 3703671538511

TP-Link Deco X55

2 feet10 feet20 feet30 feet
iPhone 12 Pro Max739680613565
Google Pixel 3611573509443

Other routers we tested

We tested more than a dozen routers and mesh kits to determine which ones are best for gaming. Here are other tested models we do and don’t recommend.

Other routers we recommend for Xfinity

ASUS ROG Rapture GT-AX11000 ($261.70*): This router rivals the Archer AX11000 in speed, connectivity, and free features, but at a higher cost. For the price, it adds printer sharing, Google support, a VPN client, and gaming tools.

View on Amazon

TP-Link Archer AX90 ($299.99*): The AX90 provides great Wi-Fi 6 speeds, three bands, and free security and parental controls. It even supports multigig internet to boot.

View on Amazon

Other routers we don’t recommend for Xfinity

Amazon Eero Pro 6 3-pack ($599.99*): Normally, we’d recommend this mesh kit because it has great Wi-Fi 6 speeds, but it’s downright expensive, and many notable features require a subscription.

View on Amazon

TP-Link Archer A10 ($79.99*): This router is $5 cheaper than the newer Wi-Fi 6 model. The only drawback is the newer model has fewer streams.

View on Amazon

FAQ about routers for Xfinity

Which modem works with these routers?

Cable internet modems compatible with Xfinity must meet one of the following requirements:

  • One open 1 Gbps Ethernet LAN port for routers that support 1 Gbps internet; or
  • Two open Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports that support link aggregation; or
  • One open 2.5 Gbps Ethernet LAN port

 

Do these routers work with Xfinity gateways?

The routers listed above supporting a 1 Gbps internet connection should work with any Xfinity gateway with an open Gigabit Ethernet port (LAN). We suggest disabling Wi-Fi in the gateway unless you want two separate Wi-Fi networks running in your home.

To use routers with a single 2.5 Gbps WAN port or 2 Gbps WAN using link aggregation, you’ll need a gateway with an open 2.5 Gbps Ethernet LAN port or two open Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports that support link aggregation.

For example, you can configure the bottom-right Ethernet port on the new Xfinity xFi gateway (Technicolor CGM4981COM) as a 2.5 Gbps LAN connection—otherwise, Xfinity may use this port as a 2.5 Gbps WAN connection to its fiber ONT. The wording in the manual indicates that the gateway may support link aggregation too.

Are these routers better than Xfinity’s new xFi gateway?

No, not based on the Technicolor CGM4981COM specifications. It’s a Wi-Fi 6E gateway, so it includes a third 6 GHz band—the Wi-Fi routers listed above do not. We compiled this list for Xfinity customers who want to use store-bought modems and routers.

Do these routers work with Xfinity’s fiber internet?

You can use these routers with the Arris X5001 supplied to fiber internet customers, but the gateway doesn’t support link aggregation. It also doesn’t have a 2.5 Gbps Ethernet port, so the most you’ll get out of any router connected to this gateway is 1 Gbps.

Disclaimer

Author -

Kevin Parrish has more than a decade of experience working as a writer, editor, and product tester. He began writing about computer hardware and soon branched out to other devices and services such as networking equipment, phones and tablets, game consoles, and other internet-connected devices. His work has appeared in Tom’s Hardware, Tom's Guide, Maximum PC, Digital Trends, Android Authority, How-To Geek, Lifewire, and others. At HighSpeedInternet.com, he focuses on internet security.

Editor - Rebecca Lee Armstrong

Rebecca Lee Armstrong has more than six years of experience writing about tech and the internet, with a specialty in hands-on testing. She started writing tech product and service reviews while finishing her BFA in creative writing at the University of Evansville and has found her niche writing about home networking, routers, and internet access at HighSpeedInternet.com. Her work has also been featured on Top Ten Reviews, MacSources, Windows Central, Android Central, Best Company, TechnoFAQ, and iMore.